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[Sunday Sept. 18, 2016]

Had an early morning meeting so it seemed a waste to not get out on the water for a while since I was up anyway.

kayaking

kayaking

Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival -- Saturday September 10, 2016

I've been to the Festival many times but decided this year to focus in on some small boats that I've seen on the internet the last year that I thought were interesting. And as a bonus I met several people that I knew or knew about and saw what they were doing.

Being a SOF ( Skin on Frame ) builder I will start with some SOF boats but will be adding more to this page in the next few days.

I start my day by getting up early and catching the first ferry from Edmonds so that I can get a good ( free ) parking space. By the time I get to Port Townsend about the only thing open is a coffee shop where I trek down to with all of the other early birds.

coffee image

Once the doors open at 9 am I pay my fee and right off I see that Brian Shultz has a prime location so I stop and talk a bit before he gets too busy. This is his first time working here and he seems to be getting a lot of interest. I hope so. If you know Brian's work, he deserves it. If you don't check out the next two images and the head over to his web site Cape Falcon Kayaks.

sof image

sof image

Here are a couple more SOF boats. I don't know the makers but they look pretty nice, including an Adirondack Guide Boat, something that I'm working on myself.

sof image

sof image


Before I go on, here are some pictures of lots of rigging and a REALLY big boat. This was the first year that I bypassed all of that stuff and focused just on small boats. It's all good, but as you can see, it's easy to get rigging over dose.

pt image

pt image

virginia v image

virginia v image


OK, back to the small boats.

The next 4 pictures are of a boat of the microcruiser class called "Paradox". The first 2 pictures and the second 2 pictures are different boats on display BTW. Microcruisers are interesting, in a way, kind of. Sort of. Paradox is 13' 10" long and 48" wide. People have done some pretty ambitious things in microcruisers including trans Atlantic crossings and circumnavigation. Microcruisers tend to be capsules that allow them to go out in open seas "safely". Some of the benefits include a lower cost and the ability to get into small places that wouldn't be accessable in larger craft.

I'm interested in them from a design point - trying to get the most out of the least - and might try my hand at designing and building one someday. On the other hand, for a person like me who really loves the lines of the classic boats, it's a little hard on my eyes. But then beauty is in the eye of the beholder so I might get to like one if I sailed in it for a while.

If you're interested in the Paradox or microcruising in general, do a search and you'll find lots of info and pictures.

paradox image

paradox image

paradox image

paradox image


Next up is a boat that I saw on the internet last year and was immediately smitten. (I am oft smitten by boats) It is a Swampscott dory which was decked over and a small cabin made so that it could participate in the Race to Alaska, aka R2AK. I finally got to see it this year at Port Townsend and found out that it was for sale. I wish I would have stuck around to find out how much they wanted for it, but wisely, I immediately left the scene. There is not a lot of information about it, but I found this: Race to Alaska which tells about R2AK and the Team Boatyard Boys who are responsible for this lovely piece of work.

You can search and learn more about the quirky R2AK and learn more about Swampscott dories by doing a search for it as well.

paradox image

paradox image

paradox image


Here are a couple of boats that have been proudly displayed on the internet for the last year or so. The first two pics are of William Garden's "Eel" commonly known as the Garden Eel. Found on Craigslist and restored by Marty Loken, this boat was for sale. If only...

The other boat is another double ender, the Spitsgatter PAX. A real honey of a boat.

garden eel image

garden eel image

pax image


The next 3 images are of an Adirondack Guide Boat. The hull of this boat is built with wooden strips, but I am building one that will be skin on frame. Either way they are gorgeous boats that may look like a canoe but are actually a double ended rowboat with ends that are higher than a canoe and a flate plate on the bottom. I've been working on my boat in fits and starts because the ribs take so long to make. I'm hoping to get it done next summer, but until then I'll just have to look at other people's Guide Boats.

guideboat image

guideboat image

guideboat image


There were a couple of living spaces that were nicely done as well. The first was this neat little houseboat that was designed and build by Christopher Cunningham. The pop up cabin is in the back of the boat which makes it looked rather 'turned around'. It has a wood stove, a sink, and a queen sized sleeping space inside, which can be changed into a table where about 4 people can dine. It can sail, motor, and row from inside or outside the cabin. This was not the first time I've seen this boat. I went over to Chris' house and he gave me a tour of it a few months back. It's kind of the tiny house of boats...

houseboat image

houseboat image

... and speaking of tiny houses, there was a nicely done tiny house (on land of course). If memory serves me right, they'll build you one like it for about $78,000.

tiny house image

tiny house image

tiny house image

tiny house image


There were a lot of rowing shells and groups getting out on the water, but I didn't spend much time snapping pics as you can see. Read "Boys in the Boat". Great read.

shell image

shell image


And last but not least, something VERY traditional. I'm not well versed on these types of boat. A faering perhaps?

faering image

Anyway, that was my trip to the Port Townsend Woodenboat Festival this year. There was a lot going on so I just focused on some of the 'humbler' craft. One doesn't have to be well heeled to get out on the water!




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